Monday, July 24, 2017

5 More SEO Myths To Leave Behind

Myth #1:

“The H1 is the most important on-page element”

Your H1 is still important, but it’s not the most important.

Think of the content structure on your webpage as an outline.

It’s a tiered approach to presenting information to users and search engines.

What title tag your headline is wrapped in has little to no influence on your overall SEO -- that title tag (whether it’s an H1, H2, H3, etc.) is only used for styling purposes.



“The H1 is the most important on-page element”

Your H1 is is still important, but it’s not the most important. Think of the content structure on your web page as an outline.

It’s a tiered approach to presenting information to users and search engines.




What title tag your headline is wrapped in has little to no influence on your overall SEO -- that title tag (whether it’s an H1, H2, H3, etc.) is only used for styling purposes.

Moz’s Search
Engine Ranking
Factor

https://moz.com/
search-ranking-factors

The H1 is part of your CSS (custom style sheet) that a designer puts together to reference what font styling and size will be applied to a particular piece of content.

This used to be more important, but search engines are smarter these days, and --unfortunately -- people spammed this to death.

So, it really doesn’t matter what header tag you use, as long as you present your most important concepts upfront and closer to the top of the page.

Remember, you’re optimizing your page for users first and foremost, which means that you want to
tell them ASAP what your page is about through a clear headline.


Myth #2:

“My homepage needs a lot of content”

Have you ever come across a homepage littered with copy? Or, on the opposite spectrum, a homepage with barely any content at all?

Think of your homepage as the gateway to your business. Visualize it! This is your chance to make a first impression and convey what you’re all about.

“My homepage needs a lot of content”

Have you ever come across a homepage littered with copy? Or, on the opposite spectrum, a homepage with barely any content at all?

Think of your homepage as the gateway to your business. Visualize it! This is your chance to make a first impression and convey what you’re all about.

Maybe your value proposition is simplicity -- in that case, just a single login makes sense
(especially if your name is Dropbox).

For most marketers, however, there is a need for a bit more content and context than that.

Your homepage content should be long enough to clarify who you are, what you do, where
you’re located (if you’re local), your value proposition, and what visitors should do next.

These visitors should leave satisfied, not overwhelmed or underwhelmed -- and certainly not confused.

Some people have the notion that if you have more pages, you will get more traffic to your website.

Just like link building, creating content just to have more pages will not help you.

Make sure you are focusing your content on quality, not quantity. If you do not have good content, you will not rank well and all of

Some people have the notion that if you have more pages, you will get more traffic to your website. Just like link building, creating content just to have more pages will not help you.

Make sure you are focusing your content on quality, not quantity. If you do not have good content, you will not rank well and all of


Myth #3:

“The more pages I have, the better”


In the past, SEO was all about manipulating data and keywords to gain search engine rankings.

However with the leak of Google’s Quality Rating Guide


QualitY back in August, it has become over

crystal clear that modern SEO is all about adding quality rather than quantity. We shifted

QuAntity our entire content marketing strategy to be about the user, creating engaging content that
compels our audience to take action.

- Phil Laboon, Eyeflow Internet Marketing those pages you created will not help your cause.

Logically, you would think that the larger the footprint of your website, the better you would rank -- but it’s simply not true.

First, not everything you publish gets indexed (and rightfully so). Second, sometimes, pages get indexed, but don’t remain in the index.

And third, just because you have pages indexed doesn’t mean they will drive qualified traffic and leads.

Unfortunately, those who strive to have lots of pages on their website also tend to overlook the quality of that content -- and realistically, it’s difficult to strive for both.

The aim should be to publish what is most relevant. Have your content be at its best.

Introduced in February, 2011, Google’s Panda algorithm updates have been getting better and better at detecting bad content.

Nowadays, if you have poor content it is possible you may face a Google penalty, so make sure you created great content that users want to read.

Myth #4

“Good user experience is an added bonus, not a requirement”

“Good user experience is an added bonus, not a requirement”

As Google began to provide better results to it’s users, they were able to invest more in their search algorithm.

Through this investment, they began to incorporate new metrics such as a user’s experience and website engagement into their ranking algorithm.

Where do take your SEO strategy when you’ve got links, titles, and content covered?



Recently we’ve revamped our site to offer a better user experience. Within three months of rolling out the changes, time on site is up 30% and our bounce rate is down 9%, all while our search traffic is up almost 110%.

Google is looking for quality indicators. Make sure your user experience isn’t sending the wrong ones. - Nick Reese, BroadbandNow

It makes sense. If Google sends you to a web page, they want to make sure you have a good experience on that page.

They are after all a business too, and thus they want to delight their users.

Think about it from the search engine’s point of view: they didn’t create the webpage themselves, but they are endorsing it.

They need to ensure that users have a good experience on that page to keep people coming back to Google.

To improve your website’s user experience, you’ll want to focus on things like page load time, bounce rate, time on page, page views per visit, and how far a person scrolls down the page.

As long as you satisfy the number one goal of creating quality content that people can easily digest and enjoy, your content will naturally satisfy a search engine’s ranking algorithms, helping your content to organically rise to the top.


Myth #5:

“Local SEO doesn’t matter anymore”

If you are a local business, having a website isn’t enough to rank well in Google’s local search listings.

If you want to rank well you need to unlock, verify, and optimize a Google+ Business Page (referred to more recently as a

“Local SEO doesn’t matter anymore”
If you are a local business, having a website isn’t enough to rank well in Google’s local search listings.

If you want to rank well you need to unlock, verify, and optimize a Google+ Business Page (referred to more recently as a Google My Business Page).

If you want to maximize your search traffic from Google, treat your Google Business Page as you would your website, and optimize accordingly. - Kristopher Jones, LSEO.com

“ This myth couldn’t be further from the truth. If you’re a local business, optimizing for local search won’t only help you get found, but it will help you get found by people who are nearby and more likely to buy from you.


Looking forward, Google will continue to take steps to bubble the best local content to the surface of search results. Need some proof?

In July of 2014, Google took a major step in this direction with the release of its new Pigeon algorithm.

The algorithm treats local search rankings more like traditional search rankings, taking hundreds of ranking signals into account. Pigeon also improved the way Google evaluates distance when determining rankings.

The bottom line: local SEO matters, probably more so now than ever before.

Read More Here

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